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. before the upgrade, greece's rating had fallen to selective default, which meant it failed to pay on one or more of its obligations. now it was pushed upward to b minus. this shows that greece can meet its financial commitments. i spoke to the fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. >> i think was s&p is catching up to is the improved political goodwill in the rest of the euro area towards the greek economy. yesterday, greece got 34 billion euros as a quid pro quo for having implemented a long list of reforms and fiscal austerity. s&p as saying, we expect this money to continue to flow from up euro area. nd we expect thre greek government to continue to implement economic reforms in the future. >> does this upgrade change anything for grece in rea ?ce ter >> the greek exit from the euro area is an extremely unlikely event, precisely for the reason s&p outlined -- that the euro area has politically decided to keep greece in the euro area. this is not something that will make a big difference in the short term, but because it does not reflect a change in the domestic
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
that the andard & poor's has upgraded greece's sovereign credit rating by six notches. the ratings agency cited the country's commitment to debt reduction and monetary injections by international lenders. s&p raised greece's credit rating on tuesday from selective default to b-minus. the new rating is still low and not suited to investment, but s&p officials say the outlook is stable. the greek government bought back sovereign bonds from commercial banks and the private sector earlier this month at prices lower than the face value. s&p officials praised the euro zone members' decision to provide greece with financial support. they say the upgrade reflects s&p's view that greece's neighbors are serious about keeping the country in the eurozone. >>> back here in japan the trade deficit came to about $11.3 billion in november, posting a red for a fifth month in a row. finance ministry officials say the figure is a record high for november. that's the third highest level since comparable records became available back in 1979. exports fell by 4.1% from a year earlier in yen terms. exports have falle
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
friday its newest ipad and ipad mini will hit stores there too. >> susie: greece is one step closer to getting $57 billion in bailout loans. german lawmakers approved the deal reached earlier this week. greece agreed to measures that will drastically reduce its debt over the next seven years. european stock markets and the euro rose on the news. here on wall street, tom, a neutral day on most people here, investors here feeling anxious over the gridlock on the fiscal cliff. the last day of trading for november kind of wimped out. >> tom: yeah, not a lot of price action. lots of volume, though, to end the month, lots of trading volume, but not a lot of price movement here. let's go ahead and take a look at the market focus with the major indices this friday. the major stock indices ended essentlly changed today even with the rhetoric out of washington. the s&p 500 spent most of the session in the red after the disappointing drop in consumer spending. the index finished with a fractional gain. trading volume spiked at the end of the month. 1.2 billion shares on the big board. just und
on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the econom
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >> thank you. thank you. >> we want to remember, by the way, this is emblem attic of all these nice things you have said this week for the victims of the newtown connecticut tragedy. we love the way you all have been strong in support of them. >> thank you. i very much appreciate that. michael, let me ask you, what do you want to be avoiding in 2013? >> i think you have to look at it from the standpoint of extreme. it's clearly in the bond market. it's clearly in the love for dividends. it's clearly in the love for income versus capital appreciation, versus cycle kral. i call this the rocky balboa stock market. we've had
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
of greece. greece is getting bailed out. and going on back and forth. will there be a deal by december 31st? i don't think so, but if a deal gets penned out by mid-january, we can look forward to focusing on earnings and get this fiscal cliff over with so we can see what's going on important in the world, and that's earnings. >> let me -- can i comment on that? >> yeah, sure. >> i want to comment on rick santelli's optimistic view that maybe there really is a deal in the offing. he has a point, you know. it's not over, you know, until it's over and these guys do sometimes come up with last-minute deals, but i want to be very clear. in order for that to happen john boehner basically has to agree that he's going to get a deal out of house with majority democrat votes, and i don't see why he does that before january 3rd. >> you're assuming the president has all the leverage, and i think the president would have a horrible legacy starting out with such turmoil, so i disagree. i think there's movement on the white house side on entitlements. >> rick, you do have to accept the fact that john boeh
much time talking about europe and greece. the rest of the world is absolutely on fire, where people obviously focus on is china. in september, they approved infrastructure projects. love the way the stocking is acting the last couple of days. dagen: you are bullish on the global economy. charles: for a while now. connell: you are not worried about china athol? charles: i think china is going to continue to be on a roll. i am also impressed with brazil, indonesia and turkey. the rest of the world really doing extraordinarily well. connell: we like when you go global on us, charles. what do you use, google maps or apple? charles: stuart varney is probably better than me when it comes to these smart phones. connell: i do remember when you got away from the flip phone. charles: that is only because i left it in the green room. i heard someone from the smithsonian came up. dagen: charles, thank you so much. connell: let's go to this google graphic story. it is a very popular app. let's put it that way. we will talk about that coming up. more from washington, the house speaker ready to pu
are watching greece again. mistakes are being raised and time is running out. >> the greek parliament at an emotional session. detaals going on outside. >> facebook has made its debut at. >> the market is having a turtle bay. and facebook is doing relatively well. liz: blockbuster upholding the insurance mandate that health care bill. >> is about access to care. >> the big rally in the markets across the board. a major blowout at the top of citigroup. >> we talked to charlie gasper enough today. the auto bailout proves to be interesting. you believe it was the one that won ohio for the president? >> yes, i believe it was great for the president. i think it hurts the governor. liz: today, the thousandth episode of countdown to the closing bell. >> i'm here to say congratulations. >> watching the show. at the end of the day, sometimes you get a little tired. some people take that five hour energy drink. and i just want you. you just have so much energy. >> here at the london olympics. >> let's talk about your job. >> okay. liz: you are the longest continuing sponsor the olympicc. from b
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
for revenues, including tax rate hikes even though i do not like them to save the country from becoming greece. i will not set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. >> i know it is hard for republicans. the president ran on a platform. 250. he won 60% of the voters. peter: we will see what senator reid puts on the floor on thursday. we will see if it is something that some of these republicans can vote for, ashley, and see if that can avoid the fiscal cliff. the president and speaker both that they will cut their vacations short and return to washington this week to keep trying to work something out. ashley: i am surprised you got anyone would you made those calls today, peter. time is running out. peter barnes nbc. peter, thank you very much. ashley: a fox business exclusive. jeffrey, thank you so much for being here. you are bullish. >> there is an old market for a lot longer than i go back in this business. what we sell in mid-november, especially on the 16th and 19th, without getting too technical, we saw things like outside days and offside gaps. that was a key reversal. we also saw somewhat s
the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused on the wage improvement in competitiveness. >> all right giles, more to come from you you. also we'll hear from the stars of les mis about why the classic story will resonate with the current economic climate. and later in the program, we'll also hear from the nigerian finance minister about the resources boom. but you what about the corruption issue. and we'll also hear first from apple's new ceo tim cook about steve jobs' legacy and his future plans for the tech giant. plus of course we'll continue to keep you updated on the reaction and the latest dealings from the earthquake in japan. >>> a 7.3 magnitude earthqu
of a break-up, notably let by a greece exit were too high, higher than keeping greece in. >> and who were some of the past winners? what in your point of view is the most important criteria for picking person of the year? what is this supposed to represent? >> it's an important contribution to innovation. we've had receive jobs, for example, as person of the year. we earlier, five years ago, we had picked shawn claude trichet, the then president of the european central bank because he led the central bank response in 2001. so i think it's someone who has made a decisive, positive contribution to economic policy, public policy and that is probably why we wouldn't choose the north korean lead, who just let up a north korean missile this week. >> are there any regrets over choosing trichet now? >> i don't think so. he played an important role. we think mr. draghi has been somewhat bolder in his approach, notably through the money transactions which are designed to intervene in the bond market to reduce spreads where, in effect, speculators are betting on a break up of the eurozone, which is
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
to europe for inspiration and guidance for fiscal policy, taking greece, perhaps, as a standard for dealing with economic and budget crises. the speaker did a charge the president is slow walking the nation to the brink of a fiscal cliff. that is one of the speakers firmest in the strongest statements yet. >> this is in a progress report because there is no progress to report. the white house has wasted another week. there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. lou: inconveniently the congressional budget office today reported that the federal deficit is already bulging. the cbo reports for the first two months of fiscal 2013 that number $2,902,000,000,000, $57 billion more than the same two month time span last year. and the labor department today reported the unemployment rate fell to the 77%. good news, the lowest jobless rate in four years. the lower unemployment rate, however, the consequence of the more than 300,000 people who dropped out of
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
such as greece and portugals of the world, and you get 65 percent or 70 percent debt to g.d.p., it is a red flag and 95 95 percent, that is a problem but our number will be so gigantic it is hard to understand how question have a vibrant economy when we pay $1 trillion a year in interest. >>neil: the markets seem to fall the lack thereof of the talks. is that a sign they are worried? >>guest: the market is worried the market wants closure of the debt ceiling. they do nut want this part of negotiations. we saw what happened last year, disaster. whatever deal is cut, the most important thing for wall street is the debt ceiling debate goes away for a year or month. >>neil: i think speaker boehner speaking to reporters today on what his plans were, i want you to react. >> tomorrow the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american and the president will have a decision to make. he can call on senate democrats to pass that bill. or he can be responding for the largest tax increase in american history. >>neil: is this his way of saying, it is in your cart. >>guest:
, we had to baja, the bp oil spill, nuclear meltdown, debt downgrades, greece, italy, spain, foreclosures, student loans, how many things do we have to get fearful about before we start to believe in this economy? it is not booming. i am not saying it is perfect, not saying it is 1980s again, is not but is growing 2% per year, maybe 2.2, two.three, and it keeps growing. we have not had a recession since march of 2009. >> it is media granddad as almost people feel. if we take the consumer back and put them in the jobs report we did see the number of hours increase as did wages. what do you make of that? does that give you hope? >> it does. if you look at car sales in november, automobile sales, fifteen million vehicles were sold in november. highest since december of 2007. that weakness we saw in cars and auto sales in october and retail sales, i think because of sandy it is going to be over. november and december will be great month for the consumer. i do have hope. i don't think we're going to boom. we won't grow 4% we will grow between 2% and 3% real growth next year in 20
comes up over the year. liz: worried about greece and ireland and portugal, and italy, spain, then the election. go back to the primaries. what will happen with the primaries, then election, then fiscal cliff. it's always something. all you really saw if you look at one are to your charts of the s&p, dow, you name it. not exactly a straight shot, but it was a rally. people sitting on the sidelines terrified, shaking their hands saying we are not going to buy. look at the far left. now where we are today, you're looking at what some of you out there miss because you were scared. how did you convince people there is more room to run normally you don't believe that? >> for us it is very much business. with respect to these various crises are fears of the fiscal cliff for the election are what have you that the rate -- create uncertainties in investors' minds, it's often better to adjust to now. ridge example is the election. in early november right after words two weeks later, 11%, markets is just grew up. be classy about this. event guess what. yesterday or the day before we we
. a positive story out of greece. they gave us a little bit of an early move to the upside. that was all washed away. on the employment data and the adp number we got the first shot at. the expectation for job growth is really one of the smallest numbers we expected to see all year. it should not be too difficult to hurdle to get over. lori: is it fair to say that concerns have been factored into the price market? >> the whole idea that the result has been priced in. the result has not come to pass by the 31st. the market could be in a very precarious position. lori: okay, alan, oil at a two week high. what is the driver there? >> what i am looking at right now is kind of a tug-of-war going on. the fiscal cliff could send crude oil off. we have tensions in the middle east. some better data coming out of china. right now, to me, it looks like a tug-of-war. they are taking it up to the 90 level. it has to settle above $90 before i am a buyer. very careful and very leery right now, it is the sharp selloff that is going to happen. lori: interesting. the commodity markets still care about the cliff.
is betting against the euro. the fact that it's a, greece exiting the eurozone is going to drag down the euro with it. i don't think that's the way you want to play that this coming year. the euro is supported by trade and investment flows, they keep it on an even keel. where you want to focus are on those currencies that have an interest rate advantage, you focus on those currencies that have export-led growth, particularly those that are linked to commodities. i like the canadian dollar for 2013, and the emerging market space i also like the south african rand, a large producer, of course, of precious metals. liz: okay, north of the border, i get that, but you're looking at a south african rand where there is a gyrating political climate sometimes there. you have strikes at the very metal mines and natural resource mines that people talk about. why do you feel that that's sort of a play that people might be at least considering? >> well, i think that as the u.s. dollar we cannens on improving -- weakens on improving conditions this year, that helps to buoy commodity prices, okay? that is go
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
the european markets are up for the year except portugal, which is up slightly. even greece is up year to date. i don't think you're too late on that trade at all. in fact, i think, quite frankly, the structural changes that are happening in europe could produce growth for many years come. >> where are you putting money to work, george? >> the fiscal cliff is sort of the uncertainty du jour. people are always worried about next uncertainty. you need to blow past that and think about where the next good stocks going to be, how can i invest, how can i participate? taxes are likely to go up, but this is a lot of rattling. both sides of the aisle would come together. they'll figure out what's best. at the end of the day, they know they have to help the little guy, the consumer. pool corp. sells everything but the water. they're suppliers for the pool industry. we think they'll grow at 18%. they have very little debt. it's like an annuity. all the pools in this country are seven years old. we love that kind of stock. >> bill, i take issue with the idea this is just saber rattling. if dividends trip
rumors out of greece. >> you guys hopeful on the floor that we get a deal sometime soon? >> you may not get a finalized deal but you'll get something done before the year end which will give us confidence to keep the market stabilized. >> members of the house tomorrow go home tomorrow for christmas. can you get a deal if they are home? >> i think you can. i think it's a little more di
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